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One might even go as far as agreeing with Meili’s point that the Sask. Party’s obstreperous refusal to put forward a better GHG reduction plan paved the way for the Trudeau Liberal government to impose something nobody wanted.

Moe and company have been all too comfortable pouring combustibles on smouldering embers that threaten to burst into a prairie fire of separation.

But given both Trudeau’s handling of this and Saskatchewan’s history, no one can be surprised.

Saskatchewan politics being what it always is, it only makes sense for Moe to put forward his best possible argument as to why a Sask. Party government is the best choice to take on Ottawa on this province’s behalf.

This is, after all, a time-honoured tradition in provincial politics for governments of all stripes. NDP premiers Allan Blakeney and Lorne Calvert ran campaigns themed around “standing up for Saskatchewan” on constitutional and equalization payment matters. Even the province’s last Liberal premier, Ross Thatcher, did this. And it can be argued that the one thing contributing to Progressive Conservative premier Grant Devine’s downfall was is close connections to PC prime minister Brian Mulroney.

Trudeau, however, takes federal animosity to the next level.

Regardless of Tuesday’s Supreme Court hearing, the feds unwillingness to compromise on even the smallest things is only to Sask. Party’s political benefit.

Mandryk is the political columnist for the Regina Leader-Post and Saskatoon StarPhoenix. 

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