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Fiddler has carriage of a wide number of files in her regular duties with Victim Services, but she also has 18 long-term missing persons files. She says in general, a missing persons file is considered long-term once it reaches the six-month mark.

The files she carries have each impacted her in their own way. Tamra Keepness, Kimberly Cruickshank, Richele Lee Bear, Ronald Kay — names that are familiar to the public have become a part of Fiddler’s being.

Tamra Jewel Keepness 06 July 2011 (A1) Sorrowful Anniversary: Disappearances still unsolved. A3 10 July 2011 (Sun pg 11) Tamra Jewel Keepness 29 March 2012 (A1) Tamra Jewel Keepness 24 Jan. 2013 (A3) Tamra Jewel Keepness
Tamra Jewel Keepness Photo by HO: RCMP /jpg

She also has far older cases, including one involving a man who hasn’t been seen by his family since the late-1950s. Gilbert Brabant’s son reported him missing, and the family has yet to learn what happened to him.

Fiddler notes missing persons cover a gamut of circumstances. In some cases, the person chose to walk away. In others, their lives were taken.

In many cases, Fiddler has contact information for families, but not all. In the case of Jaroslav Joseph “Joe” Heindl — missing since 2002 — family contacts have since passed away and there’s no one listed currently.

This being Missing Persons Week, Fiddler would like to change that, not just about Heindl but other cases in which family isn’t listed.

“Missing Persons Week is great just for sending that message out and hoping that families will reach out to us,” she says.

She also wants the extra spotlight on missing persons to let people know about the supports that exist should they be needed.

Saskatchewan’s missing persons liaison program has proven groundbreaking, not just in this province but nationally. Not only is it said to be the first of its kind in Canada, liaisons created a toolkit that has been requested by jurisdictions out of province.

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